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Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Jun;79(3):327-32. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2010.03.001. Epub 2010 Apr 13.

Exercise-induced energy expenditure: implications for exercise prescription and obesity.

Author information

  • 1Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada. rcolley@cheo.on.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Walking is commonly recommended to help with weight management. We measured total energy expenditure (TEE) and its components to quantify the impact of increasing exercise-induced energy expenditure (ExEE) on other components of TEE.

METHODS:

Thirteen obese women underwent an 8-week walking group intervention. TEE was quantified using doubly labeled water, ExEE was quantified using heart rate monitors, daily movement was assessed by accelerometry and resting metabolic rate was measured using indirect calorimetry.

RESULTS:

Four of the 13 participants achieved the target of 1500kcalwk(-1) of ExEE and all achieved 1000kcalwk(-1). The average ExEE achieved by the group across the 8 weeks was 1434+/-237kcalwk(-1). Vigorous physical activity, as assessed by accelerometry, increased during the intervention by an average of 30min per day. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) decreased, on average, by 175kcald(-1) (-22%) from baseline to the intervention and baseline fitness was correlated with change in NEAT.

CONCLUSIONS:

Potential alterations in non-exercise activity should be considered when exercise is prescribed. The provision of appropriate education on how to self-monitor daily activity levels may improve intervention outcomes in groups who are new to exercise.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Strategies to sustain incidental and light physical activity should be offered to help empower individuals as they develop and maintain healthy and long-lasting lifestyle habits.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20392589
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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