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Dis Colon Rectum. 2010 May;53(5):830-7. doi: 10.1007/DCR.0b013e3181d320b1.

Lifestyle, occupational, and reproductive factors and risk of colorectal cancer.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. asoliman@umich.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Lifestyle factors and environmental exposures might help explain the risk of colorectal carcinoma in countries where the incidence is low, but unique patterns of young onset and a high proportion of rectal cancer exist.

METHODS:

We obtained detailed lifestyle information from 421 patients with colorectal cancer and 439 hospital-controls in Egypt. Logistic regression models were computed to evaluate the risk factors of colorectal carcinoma.

RESULTS:

A history of pesticide exposure and more frequently eating food directly from farms were significantly associated with a higher risk of colorectal carcinoma (odds ratio = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.1-5.9, and odds ratio = 4.6; 95% CI = 1.5-14.6, respectively). Parous women who reported 7 or more live births or breastfed for 19 months or longer per live birth had a significantly lower risk for colorectal carcinoma (odds ratio = 0.3; 95% CI = 0.2-0.7, and odds ratio = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.1-0.4, respectively). Compared with patients aged 40 years or older, industrial exposures were more common in younger patients (P = .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Agricultural and industrial exposures were associated with increased risk of colorectal carcinoma, whereas prolonged lactation and increased parity were inversely associated with colorectal carcinoma in women. Further research to elucidate the biological role of intense environmental and industrial exposures and reproductive factors including lactation may further clarify the etiology of colorectal cancer.

PMID:
20389219
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3223860
Free PMC Article
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