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Free Radic Res. 2010 May;44(5):479-96. doi: 10.3109/10715761003667554.

Reactive oxygen species in cancer.

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  • 1Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville FL 32224, USA.

Abstract

Elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been detected in almost all cancers, where they promote many aspects of tumour development and progression. However, tumour cells also express increased levels of antioxidant proteins to detoxify from ROS, suggesting that a delicate balance of intracellular ROS levels is required for cancer cell function. Further, the radical generated, the location of its generation, as well as the local concentration is important for the cellular functions of ROS in cancer. A challenge for novel therapeutic strategies will be the fine tuning of intracellular ROS signalling to effectively deprive cells from ROS-induced tumour promoting events, towards tipping the balance to ROS-induced apoptotic signalling. Alternatively, therapeutic antioxidants may prevent early events in tumour development, where ROS are important. However, to effectively target cancer cells specific ROS-sensing signalling pathways that mediate the diverse stress-regulated cellular functions need to be identified. This review discusses the generation of ROS within tumour cells, their detoxification, their cellular effects, as well as the major signalling cascades they utilize, but also provides an outlook on their modulation in therapeutics.

PMID:
20370557
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3880197
Free PMC Article
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