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J Neurosurg. 2010 Aug;113(2):333-9. doi: 10.3171/2010.3.JNS091882.

Predictors of mortality following treatment of intracranial hemangiopericytoma.

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  • 1Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECT:

Intracranial hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare and malignant extraaxial tumor with a high proclivity toward recurrence and metastasis. Given this lesion's rarity, little information exists on prognostic factors influencing mortality rates following treatment with surgery or radiation or both. A systematic review of the published literature was performed to ascertain predictors of death following treatment for intracranial HPC.

METHODS:

The authors identified 563 patients with intracranial HPC in the published literature, 277 of whom had information on the duration of follow-up. Statistical analysis of survival was performed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Hemangiopericytoma was diagnosed in 246 males and 204 females, ranging in age from 1 month to 80 years. Among patients treated for HPC, overall median survival was 13 years, with 1-, 5-, 10-, and 20-year survival rates of 95%, 82%, 60%, and 23%, respectively. Gross-total resection alone (105 patients) was associated with superior survival rates overall, with a median survival of 13 years, whereas subtotal resection alone (23 patients) resulted in a median survival of 9.75 years. Subtotal resection plus adjuvant radiotherapy led to a median survival of 6 years. Gross-total resection was associated with a superior survival benefit to patients regardless of the addition or absence of radiation, and patients receiving > 50 Gy of radiation had worse survival outcomes (median survival 4 vs 18.6 years, p < 0.01, log-rank test). Patients with tumors of the posterior fossa had a median survival of 10.75 versus 15.6 years for those with non-posterior fossa tumors (p < 0.05, log-rank test).

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment with gross-total resection provides the greatest survival advantage and should be pursued aggressively as an initial therapy. The addition of postoperative adjuvant radiation does not seem to confer a survival benefit.

PMID:
20367074
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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