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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2010 Jun;38(4):394-402. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2010.03.007. Epub 2010 Apr 2.

Smoking outcome by psychiatric history after behavioral and varenicline treatment.

Author information

  • 1Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. mcclure.j@ghc.org

Abstract

Treatment outcomes were compared across smokers enrolled in the COMPASS cessation trial with (positive psychiatric history [PH+], n = 271) and without (PH-, n = 271) a diagnosis of PH based on medical record evidence of anxiety, depression, psychotic disorder, or bipolar disorder. Everyone received behavioral counseling plus varenicline and was followed for 6 months post quit date. PH+ smokers took varenicline for fewer days on average (59.4 vs. 68.5, p < or = .01) but did not differ in their use of behavioral treatment. PH+ smokers were more likely to report anxiety and depression, but side-effect intensity ratings did not differ after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, all side effects were rated as moderate intensity or less. Groups had similar 30-day abstinence rates at 6 months (31.5% PH+ vs. 35.4% PH-, p = .35). In sum, having a psychiatric diagnosis in this trial did not predict worse treatment outcome or worse treatment side effects.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20363092
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2860053
Free PMC Article

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