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Thromb Res. 2010 Jun;125(6):e329-34. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2010.03.004. Epub 2010 Apr 2.

Correlation and association of plasma interleukin-6 and plasma platelet-derived microparticles, markers of activated platelets, in healthy individuals.

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  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Kishiwada City Hospital, 1000 Gakuharachou, Kishiwada City, Osaka, 596-8501. tueba@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to clarify the correlation and association of plasma IL-6 and PDMPs, both of which are associated with metabolic syndrome, in healthy individuals.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 464 healthy Japanese volunteers (210 men and 254 women, median age 39 and 35years, respectively) who had no signs, symptoms or history of cardiovascular- or cerebrovascular disease and took no medications. We assayed their IL-6 levels with a conventional ELISA kit and their PDMP levels by ELISA and monoclonal antibodies against CD42b and CD42a (glycoprotein Ib and IX).

RESULTS:

By multivariate analysis, the plasma level of PDMP was correlated with diastolic blood pressure (p=0.015), platelet count (p<0.001), high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the plasma level of IL-6 (p<0.001) in men (R(2)=0.454, p<0.001) and was correlated with platelet count (p<0.001) and the plasma level of IL-6 (p<0.001) in women (R(2)=0.159, p<0.001). Quartile range of plasma level of IL-6 was associated with plasma level of PDMP after adjustment for diastolic blood pressure, platelet count, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein in men (p<0.001) and associated with plasma level of PDMP after adjustment for platelet count in women (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest the plasma IL-6 is correlated and associated with the plasma PDMPs, markers of activated platelets in healthy individuals.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20363016
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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