Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cancer Nurs. 2010 May-Jun;33(3):221-7. doi: 10.1097/NCC.0b013e3181cc51fc.

Diffusion effects of an inpatient hospice unit on improving the parent hospital's pain management of terminally ill cancer patients not receiving hospice care in Taiwan.

Author information

  • 1Chang Gung University, Graduate School of Nursing, Tao-Yuan, and Nursing Department, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, Republic of China. sttang@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The impact of hospice care on cancer-pain management at the institutional level of an acute-care hospital setting has not been addressed in prior research.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to investigate the diffusion effects of an inpatient hospice unit on improving the parent hospital's quality of pain management.

METHODS:

A convenience sample of 1370 terminally ill cancer patients not receiving hospice care in Taiwan measured pain relief experiences and perceived pain-management practices of healthcare professionals.

RESULTS:

Taiwanese terminally ill cancer patients in the with-hospice group were 2.40 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-3.76]) more likely than those in the without-hospice group to report their pain as not controlled before hospital admission. However, after patients with uncontrolled pain were hospitalized, they were equally as likely as those in the without-hospice group to report pain as not yet been relieved when interviewed (adjusted odds ratio, 1.42; 95% CI, 0.77-2.64). Patients in the with-hospice group were (1) less likely to complain about waiting too long for pain medication (adjusted odds ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.18-0.93) and (2) more or as likely to rate the amount of pain medication received as adequate (depending on the status of adequate pain control before admission) than/as those from hospitals without an inpatient hospice unit.

CONCLUSION:

Hospice care may add value at the institutional level by effectively and appropriately managing cancer pain of Taiwanese terminally ill patients not receiving hospice care.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

Translation of evidence-based strategies to manage cancer pain could be facilitated by expanding collaboration between hospice-care professionals and other healthcare professionals both within and among institutions.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk