Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2010 Mar-Apr;34(2):163-72. doi: 10.1097/RCT.0b013e3181c89d87.

Improved characterization of focal liver lesions with liver-specific gadoxetic acid disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a multicenter phase 3 clinical trial.

Author information

  • 1Department of Radiological Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1721, USA. sraman@mednet.ucla.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the safety of gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its efficacy in characterizing liver lesions.

METHODS:

Lesion characterization and classification using combined (unenhanced and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced) MRI were compared with those using unenhanced MRI and contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) using on-site clinical and off-site blinded evaluations for patients with focal liver lesions.

RESULTS:

Gadoxetic acid disodium was well tolerated in this study. For the clinical evaluation, more lesions were correctly characterized using combined (unenhanced and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced) MRI than using unenhanced MRI and spiral CT (96% vs 84% and 85%, respectively; P < or = 0.0008). For the blinded evaluation, more lesions were correctly characterized using combined MRI compared with using unenhanced MRI (61%-76% vs 48%-65%, respectively; P < or = 0.0012 for 2/3 readers); when compared with spiral CT, a similar proportion of lesions were correctly characterized.

CONCLUSIONS:

Gadoxetic acid disodium-enhanced MRI is of clinical benefit relative to unenhanced MRI and spiral CT for a radiological diagnosis of liver lesions.

PMID:
20351497
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3036163
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (3)Free text

FIGURE 1
FIGURE 2
FIGURE 3
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk