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Nat Neurosci. 2010 May;13(5):635-41. doi: 10.1038/nn.2519. Epub 2010 Mar 28.

Dopamine D2 receptors in addiction-like reward dysfunction and compulsive eating in obese rats.

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  • 1Laboratory of Behavioral and Molecular Neuroscience, Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute-Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida, USA.

Erratum in

  • Nat Neurosci. 2010 Aug;13(8):1033.

Abstract

We found that development of obesity was coupled with emergence of a progressively worsening deficit in neural reward responses. Similar changes in reward homeostasis induced by cocaine or heroin are considered to be crucial in triggering the transition from casual to compulsive drug-taking. Accordingly, we detected compulsive-like feeding behavior in obese but not lean rats, measured as palatable food consumption that was resistant to disruption by an aversive conditioned stimulus. Striatal dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) were downregulated in obese rats, as has been reported in humans addicted to drugs. Moreover, lentivirus-mediated knockdown of striatal D2Rs rapidly accelerated the development of addiction-like reward deficits and the onset of compulsive-like food seeking in rats with extended access to palatable high-fat food. These data demonstrate that overconsumption of palatable food triggers addiction-like neuroadaptive responses in brain reward circuits and drives the development of compulsive eating. Common hedonic mechanisms may therefore underlie obesity and drug addiction.

Comment in

PMID:
20348917
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2947358
Free PMC Article

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