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Acta Paediatr. 2010 Aug;99(8):1145-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2010.01806.x. Epub 2010 Mar 24.

Extremely preterm infants tolerate skin-to-skin contact during the first weeks of life.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. ram@rh.regionh.dk

Abstract

AIM:

To determine if clinically stable extremely preterm infants can maintain their temperature during skin-to-skin contact and to screen for other negative effects.

METHODS:

Continuous measurement of 22 stable infants' physical parameters 2 h before, during, and 2 h after skin-to-skin-contact. Mean gestational age at birth was 25 weeks and 4 days, mean post-natal age was 8 days, postmenstrual age was 26 weeks and 6 days, and mean actual weight 702 g. Mean duration of skin-to-skin-contact was 98 min. 16 infants were skin-to-skin with the mother, five with the father and one with an older sister.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in mean skin temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, or oxygen saturation before, during, and after skin-to-skin contact. While staying within normal range, the mean skin temperature increased 0.1 degrees C during skin-to-skin contact with the mother and decreased 0.3 degrees C during skin-to-skin contact with the father (p = 0.011) (without post-hoc correction).

CONCLUSION:

Clinically stable, extremely preterm infants can keep adequate skin temperature and adequate physical stability during skin-to-skin contact with their parents.

PMID:
20346075
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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