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J Cell Mol Med. 2011 Apr;15(4):957-69. doi: 10.1111/j.1582-4934.2010.01063.x.

Decreased caveolin-1 levels contribute to fibrosis and deposition of extracellular IGFBP-5.

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  • 1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

Our previous studies have demonstrated increased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) in fibrotic tissues and IGFBP-5 induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The mechanism resulting in increased IGFBP-5 in the extracellular milieu of fibrotic fibroblasts is unknown. Since Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) has been implicated to play a role in membrane trafficking and signal transduction in tissue fibrosis, we examined the effect of Cav-1 on IGFBP-5 internalization, trafficking and secretion. We demonstrated that IGFBP-5 localized to lipid rafts in human lung fibroblasts and bound Cav-1. Cav-1 was detected in the nucleus in IGFBP-5-expressing fibroblasts, within aggregates enriched with IGFBP-5, suggesting a coordinate trafficking of IGFBP-5 and Cav-1 from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. This trafficking was dependent on Cav-1 as fibroblasts from Cav-1 null mice had increased extracellular IGFBP-5, and as fibroblasts in which Cav-1 was silenced or lipid raft structure was disrupted through cholesterol depletion also had defective IGFBP-5 internalization. Restoration of Cav-1 function through administration of Cav-1 scaffolding peptide dramatically increased IGFBP-5 uptake. Finally, we demonstrated that IGFBP-5 in the ECM protects fibronectin from proteolytic degradation. Taken together, our findings identify a novel role for Cav-1 in the internalization and nuclear trafficking of IGFBP-5. Decreased Cav-1 expression in fibrotic diseases likely leads to increased deposition of IGFBP-5 in the ECM with subsequent reduction in ECM degradation, thus identifying a mechanism by which reduced Cav-1 and increased IGFBP-5 concomitantly contribute to the perpetuation of fibrosis.

© 2011 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

PMID:
20345844
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2995014
Free PMC Article

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