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PLoS One. 2010 Mar 22;5(3):e9769. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0009769.

Laetoli footprints preserve earliest direct evidence of human-like bipedal biomechanics.

Author information

  • 1School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America. raichlen@email.arizona.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Debates over the evolution of hominin bipedalism, a defining human characteristic, revolve around whether early bipeds walked more like humans, with energetically efficient extended hind limbs, or more like apes with flexed hind limbs. The 3.6 million year old hominin footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania represent the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Using an experimental design, we show that the Laetoli hominins walked with weight transfer most similar to the economical extended limb bipedalism of humans. Humans walked through a sand trackway using both extended limb bipedalism, and more flexed limb bipedalism. Footprint morphology from extended limb trials matches weight distribution patterns found in the Laetoli footprints.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results provide us with the earliest direct evidence of kinematically human-like bipedalism currently known, and show that extended limb bipedalism evolved long before the appearance of the genus Homo. Since extended-limb bipedalism is more energetically economical than ape-like bipedalism, energy expenditure was likely an important selection pressure on hominin bipeds by 3.6 Ma.

PMID:
20339543
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2842428
Free PMC Article
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