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Phys Ther. 2010 May;90(5):663-78. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20090071. Epub 2010 Mar 25.

Effectiveness of particle repositioning maneuvers in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physical Therapy, Midwestern University, 555 31st St, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA. jhelmi@midwestern.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether patients diagnosed with posterior canal (PC) BPPV, based on positional testing, and treated with a particle repositioning maneuver will show the resolution of benign paroxysmal positional nystagmus (BPPN) on the Dix-Hallpike Test performed 24 hours or more after treatment.

DATA SOURCES:

Data were obtained from an electronic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases from 1966 through September 2009.

STUDY SELECTION:

The study topics were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, the diagnosis of PC BPPV, treatment with the particle repositioning maneuver, and outcome measured with a positional test 24 hours or more after treatment.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Data extracted were study descriptors and the information used to code for effect size.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

In 2 double-blind RCTs, the odds in favor of the resolution of BPPN were 22 times (95% confidence interval=3.41-141.73) and 37 times (95% confidence interval=8.75-159.22) higher in people receiving the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) than in people receiving a sham treatment. This finding was supported by the results reported in 8 nonmasked quasi-RCTs. Studies with limited methodological quality suggested that a liberatory maneuver (LM) was more effective than a control intervention; there was no significant difference in the effectiveness of the LM and the effectiveness of the CRP; the self-administered CRP was more effective than the self-administered LM; and the CRP administered together with the self-administered CRP was more effective than the CRP administered alone. The Brandt-Daroff exercises were the least effective self-administered treatments.

LIMITATIONS:

The limitations included the methodological quality of the studies, the lack of quality-of-life measures, and confounding factors in reporting vertigo.

CONCLUSIONS:

Randomized controlled trials provided strong evidence that the CRP resolves PC BPPN, and quasi-RCTs suggested that the CRP or the LM performed by a clinician or with proper instruction at home by the patient resolves PC BPPN. There were no data on the effects of the maneuvers on outcomes relevant to patients.

PMID:
20338918
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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