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Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 May;91(5):1180-4. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28526. Epub 2010 Mar 24.

Antioxidant-rich spice added to hamburger meat during cooking results in reduced meat, plasma, and urine malondialdehyde concentrations.

Author information

  • 1University of California, Los Angeles Center for Human Nutrition, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Emerging science has shown the effect of oxidation products and inflammation on atherogenesis and carcinogenesis. Cooking hamburger meat can promote the formation of malondialdehyde that can be absorbed after ingestion.

OBJECTIVE:

We studied the effect of an antioxidant spice mixture on malondialdehyde formation while cooking hamburger meat and its effects on plasma and urinary malondialdehyde concentrations.

DESIGN:

Eleven healthy volunteers consumed 2 kinds of burgers in a randomized order: one burger was seasoned with a spice blend, and one burger was not seasoned with the spice blend. The production of malondialdehyde in burgers and malondialdehyde concentrations in plasma and urine after ingestion were measured by HPLC.

RESULTS:

Rosmarinic acid from oregano was monitored to assess the effect of cooking on spice antioxidant content. Forty percent (19 mg) of the added rosmarinic acid remained in the spiced burger (SB) after cooking. There was a 71% reduction in the malondialdehyde concentration (mean +/- SD: 0.52 +/- 0.02 micromol/250 g) in the meat of the SBs compared with the malondialdehyde concentration (1.79 +/- 0.17 micromol/250 g) in the meat of the control burgers (CBs). The plasma malondialdehyde concentration increased significantly in the CB group as a change from baseline (P = 0.026). There was a significant time-trend difference (P = 0.013) between the 2 groups. Urinary malondialdehyde concentrations (micromol/g creatinine) decreased by 49% (P = 0.021) in subjects consuming the SBs compared with subjects consuming the CBs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The overall effect of adding the spice mixture to hamburger meat before cooking was a reduction in malondialdehyde concentrations in the meat, plasma, and urine after ingestion. Therefore, cooking hamburgers with a polyphenol-rich spice mixture can significantly decrease the concentration of malondialdehyde, which suggests potential health benefits for atherogenesis and carcinogenesis. This trial was registered at clinical trials.gov as NCT01027052.

Comment in

PMID:
20335545
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2854897
Free PMC Article

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