Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Lasers Surg Med. 2010 Mar;42(3):264-73. doi: 10.1002/lsm.20897.

Semiautomated intraocular laser surgery using handheld instruments.

Author information

  • 1The Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

In laser retinal photocoagulation, hundreds of dot-like burns are applied. We introduce a robot-assisted technique to enhance the accuracy and reduce the tedium of the procedure.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Laser burn locations are overlaid on preoperative retinal images using common patterns such as grids. A stereo camera/monitor setup registers and displays the planned burn locations overlaid on real-time video. Using an active handheld micromanipulator, a 7 x 7 grid of burns spaced 650 microm apart is applied to both paper slides and porcine retina in vitro using 30 milliseconds laser pulses at 532 nm. Two scenarios were tested: unaided, in which the micromanipulator is inert and the laser fires at a fixed frequency, and aided, in which the micromanipulator actively targets burn locations and the laser fires automatically upon target acquisition. Error is defined as the distance from the center of the observed burn mark to the preoperatively selected target location.

RESULTS:

An experienced retinal surgeon performed trials with and without robotic assistance, on both paper slides and porcine retina in vitro. In the paper slide experiments at an unaided laser repeat rate of 0.5 Hz, error was 125+/-62 microm with robotic assistance and 149+/-76 microm without (P < 0.005), and trial duration was 70+/-8 seconds with robotic assistance and 97+/-7 seconds without (P < 0.005). At a repeat rate of 1.0 Hz, error was 129+/-69 microm with robotic assistance and 166+/-91 microm without (P < 0.005), and trial duration was 26+/-4 seconds with robotic assistance and 47+/-1 seconds without (P < 0.005). At a repeat rate of 2.0 Hz on porcine retinal tissue, error was 123+/-69 microm with robotic assistance and 203+/-104 microm without (P < 0.005).

CONCLUSION:

Robotic assistance can increase the accuracy of laser photocoagulation while reducing the duration of the operation.

PMID:
20333740
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3040371
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (8)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk