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AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2010 Apr;194(4):1027-33. doi: 10.2214/AJR.09.3221.

The educational and career impact of using medical students for triaging off-hour diagnostic imaging requests at a major academic medical center.

Author information

  • 1Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, 1320 York Ave, 27K, New York, NY 10021, USA. scott.kennedy@aya.yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this article is to evaluate the educational and career impact of using medical students for triaging off-hour diagnostic imaging requests at a major academic medical center.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A survey of former and current medical students who participated in the Emergency Department Radiology Triage Program at the Yale University School of Medicine was conducted via e-mail. Results were reported using averages or percentages or both.

RESULTS:

Twenty-six (61.9%) of the 42 participants responded. Seventeen (65.4%) of the 26 respondents pursued an additional degree while in the program. The most important factor for joining was financial, with a mean importance of 4.0 on a scale of 1 (no importance) to 5 (most important). Eleven (42.3%) of the 26 respondents stated that their participation encouraged them to pursue a career in diagnostic radiology. Nine (34.6%) of the 26 respondents stated that the program had major or moderate importance on their specialty choice, whereas 20 of the 26 (76.9%) described the program as being of at least moderate help to their medical career. The most satisfying aspect of the program, on a scale of 1 (extremely dissatisfying) to 5 (extremely satisfying), was interacting with the junior radiology resident (mean rating, 4.5), whereas the least satisfying aspect was the Veterans Affairs triage component (mean rating, 2.9).

CONCLUSION:

The use of medical students for triaging off-hour diagnostic imaging requests has proven successful from an operational standpoint; it also appears to be favorably viewed concurrently and retrospectively by the growing cohort of students who have participated.

PMID:
20308506
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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