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Mech Ageing Dev. 2010 Apr;131(4):276-86. doi: 10.1016/j.mad.2010.03.005. Epub 2010 Mar 20.

The role of vitamin E and oxidative stress in diabetes complications.

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  • 1Department of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.

Abstract

Diabetes is a disease characterized by poor glycemic control for which risk of the type 2 form increases with age. A rise in blood glucose concentration causes increased oxidative stress which contributes to the development and progression of diabetes-associated complications. Studies have shown that primary antioxidants or genetic manipulation of antioxidant defenses can at least partially ameliorate this oxidative stress and consequentially, reduce severity of diabetic complications in animal models. Data from humans is less clear and will be summarized in this review. We highlight results from studies performed to investigate the role of vitamin E in preventing diabetes-induced oxidative damage in cell culture, animal models, and human participants, and summarize evidence testing whether this nutrient has an effect on outcomes related to the diabetic complications of nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy. The most compelling evidence for an effect of vitamin E in diabetes is on protection against lipid peroxidation, whereas effects on protein and DNA oxidation are less pronounced. More studies are required to make definitive conclusions about the effect of vitamin E treatment on diabetes complications in human subjects.

(c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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