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Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;32(2):119-24. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2009.11.018. Epub 2010 Jan 12.

Association of major depression and mortality in Stage 5 diabetic chronic kidney disease.

Author information

  • 1Epidemiologic Research and Information Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. youngb@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine the association of major depression with mortality among diabetic patients with late stage CKD.

METHOD:

The Pathways Study is a longitudinal, prospective cohort study initiated to determine the impact of depression on outcomes among primary care diabetic patients. Subjects were followed from 2001 until 2007 for a mean duration of 4.4 years. Major depression, identified by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, was the primary exposure of interest. Stage 5 CKD was determined by dialysis codes and estimated glomerular filtration rate (<15 ml/min). An adjusted Cox proportional hazards multivariable model was used to determine the association of baseline major depression with mortality.

RESULTS:

Of the 4128 enrolled subjects, 110 were identified with stage 5 CKD at baseline. Of those, 34 (22.1%) had major depression. Over a period of 5 years, major depression was associated with 2.95-fold greater risk of death (95% CI=1.24-7.02) compared to those with no or few depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSION:

Major depression at baseline was associated with a 2.95-fold greater risk of mortality among stage 5 CKD diabetic patients. Given the high mortality risk, further testing of targeted depression interventions should be considered in this population.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
20302984
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3488265
Free PMC Article
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