Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):861-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.176651. Epub 2010 Mar 18.

Disparities in breast cancer survival among Asian women by ethnicity and immigrant status: a population-based study.

Author information

  • 1Northern California Cancer Center, 2201 Walnut Ave, Suite 300, Fremont, CA 94538, USA. scarlett@nccc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated heterogeneity in ethnic composition and immigrant status among US Asians as an explanation for disparities in breast cancer survival.

METHODS:

We enhanced data from the California Cancer Registry and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program through linkage and imputation to examine the effect of immigrant status, neighborhood socioeconomic status, and ethnic enclave on mortality among Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, South Asian, and Vietnamese women diagnosed with breast cancer from 1988 to 2005 and followed through 2007.

RESULTS:

US-born women had similar mortality rates in all Asian ethnic groups except the Vietnamese, who had lower mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1, 0.9). Except for Japanese women, all foreign-born women had higher mortality than did US-born Japanese, the reference group. HRs ranged from 1.4 (95% CI = 1.2, 1.7) among Koreans to 1.8 (95% CI = 1.5, 2.2) among South Asians and Vietnamese. Little of this variation was explained by differences in disease characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS:

Survival after breast cancer is poorer among foreign- than US-born Asians. Research on underlying factors is needed, along with increased awareness and targeted cancer control.

PMID:
20299648
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2853623
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk