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J Urol. 2010 May;183(5):1792-6. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2010.01.015. Epub 2010 Mar 17.

Evidence supports a faster growth rate and/or earlier transformation to clinically significant prostate cancer in black than in white American men, and influences racial progression and mortality disparity.

Author information

  • 1Wayne State University School of Medicine and Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan, USA. ipowell@med.wayne.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The incidence of prostate cancer is approximately 60% higher and the mortality rate is 2 to 3 times greater in black than in white American men. We propose that a more rapid prostate cancer growth rate and/or earlier transformation from latent to aggressive prostate cancer in black than in white men contribute to this disparity.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We evaluated entirely embedded prostate glands on autopsy from 1,056 black and white men who died of causes other than prostate cancer. We also reviewed data from our radical prostatectomy database and from the Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database.

RESULTS:

Autopsy data indicated that subclinical prostate cancer in black and white men starts at early age and clinical characteristics do not differ by race at early ages. Radical prostatectomy specimen data revealed that prostate cancer volume and Gleason grade were greater in black than in white men. Advanced or metastatic prostate cancer occurred at a 4:1 ratio in black and white men, respectively, in the Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registry database.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results showed that age at prostate cancer initiation and clinical characteristics did not differ by race in our autopsy series, prostate cancer volume after radical prostatectomy was greater in black than in white men and disease became distant disease at a ratio of 4 black men to 1 white man in the Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population. These findings support the concept that prostate cancer grows more rapidly in black than in white men and/or earlier transformation from latent to aggressive prostate cancer occurs in black than in white men.

2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Comment in

  • Editorial comment. [J Urol. 2010]
  • Editorial comment. [J Urol. 2010]
PMID:
20299055
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3840791
Free PMC Article
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