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Med J Aust. 2010 Mar 15;192(6):306-10.

The effect of evidence-based medication use on long-term survival in patients hospitalised for heart failure in Western Australia.

Author information

  • 1School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA. kteng@meddent.uwa.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine trends and predictors of prescription medications on discharge after first (index) hospitalisation for heart failure (HF), and the effect on all-cause mortality of evidence-based therapy.

DESIGN:

A retrospective multicentre cohort study, with medical record review.

SETTING:

Three tertiary-care hospitals in Perth, Western Australia.

PATIENTS:

WA Hospital Morbidity Data were used to identify a random sample of 1006 patients with an index admission to hospital for HF between 1996 and 2006.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Proportion of patients prescribed evidence-based therapy for HF on discharge from hospital; and 1-year all-cause mortality.

RESULTS:

Among 944 patients surviving to hospital discharge, the prescription rate of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) (74.3%) and loop diuretics (85.5%) remained high over the study period, whereas that of beta-blockers and spironolactone increased (10.5% to 51.3% and 1.4% to 23.3%, respectively), and digoxin prescription decreased (38.1% to 20.7%). The temporal trends in use of beta-blockers, spironolactone and digoxin were in line with clinical trial evidence. Age > or = 75 years was a significant, negative predictor of beta-blocker and spironolactone prescription. In-hospital echocardiography, performed in 53% of patients, was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of treatment with ACE inhibitors/ARBs, beta-blockers and spironolactone. Both ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers prescribed on discharge were associated with a lower adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality at 1-year (HR, 0.71; P = 0.003; and HR, 0.68; P = 0.002, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

ACE inhibitors/ARBs and beta-blockers, prescribed during initial hospitalisation for HF, are associated with improved long-term survival. Therapy became more evidence based over the study period, but echocardiography, an important predictor of evidence-based therapy, was underutilised.

PMID:
20230346
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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