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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 Aug;21(8):546-52. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2009.12.002. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

Polymorphisms in the platelet-specific collagen receptor GP6 are associated with risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction in Caucasians.

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  • 1Department of Human Genetics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Glycoprotein 6 (GP6) is a platelet-specific collagen receptor implicated in the thrombotic pathway to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but a possible genetic relationship between GP6 and AMI is poorly understood. We tested for the genetic association between AMI and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 24 loci, including GP6.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We conducted a case-control study of AMI and GP6 in a community-based population (n = 652 cases, 625 controls). We also examined men and women separately and stratified the latter by use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Among both sexes, the strongest association was for a protective missense polymorphism (rs1163662) in the GP6 gene (OR = 0.70; Bonferroni-adjusted p < 0.05). SNPs in GP6 were also strongly associated with AMI among women who reported ever taking HRT, but not among women who never took HRT. Haplotype analyses were consistent with the single-SNP findings.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this sample of white non-Hispanic men and women, several SNPs in GP6 were significantly related to risk of AMI. Development of pharmacologic therapy directed towards platelet activity and thrombosis may reduce the incidence of AMI among at-risk groups.

Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20227257
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2888832
Free PMC Article

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