Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
J Orthop Res. 2010 Sep;28(9):1149-54. doi: 10.1002/jor.21125.

Age-associated increases in the size of the infrapatellar fat pad in knee osteoarthritis as measured by 3T MRI.

Author information

  • 1Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, 375 MSRB, Box 3093, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Abstract

Obesity, as a primary risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA), has been shown to alter joint loading, but may also result in metabolic changes characterized by chronic, low-level inflammation due to increased circulating levels of adipose-derived cytokines, or "adipokines." The presence of the infrapatellar fat pad in the knee suggests that local changes in adipokine concentrations may influence knee OA. This study examined the hypotheses that the volume of the infrapatellar fat pad is correlated to the body mass index (BMI) of OA patients, and that fat pad volume is greater in subjects with OA. Fat pad volume was measured in sequential magnetic resonance (MR) images taken over one year in a cohort of 15 control and 15 knee OA subjects. No differences were observed in the fat pad volume between the two groups at baseline, 3, 6, or 12 months. In control subjects, no significant correlations were present between any parameters (age, BMI, weight, volume of fat pad at any time point). However, in the osteoarthritic group, fat pad volume was correlated with age at every time point. One possible explanation is that local factors related to knee OA may also induce enlargement of the fat pad with age. Alternatively, subjects who are prone to growth or enlargement of the fat pad may also be more prone to symptomatic OA. These findings provide intriguing preliminary data on the potential role of the infrapatellar fat pad in OA, although additional study is required to better understand the mechanisms of this relationship.

(c) 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PMID:
20225314
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3625521
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Figure 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk