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Nutr Metab (Lond). 2010 Mar 1;7:16. doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-7-16.

Lack of association between dietary fructose and hyperuricemia risk in adults.

Author information

  • 1Office of Compliance and Ethics, Archer Daniels Midland Company, 1001 North Brush College Road, Decatur, Illinois 62521, USA. sun@adm.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

High serum uric acid concentration (hyperuricemia) has been studied for its relationship with multiple adverse health outcomes, such as metabolic syndrome. Intervention studies have produced inconsistent outcomes for the relationship between fructose intake and serum uric acid concentration.

METHODS:

The association of dietary fructose intake with hyperuricemia risk in adults was examined using logistic regression and U.S. NHANES 1999-2004 databases. A total of 9,384 subjects, between the ages 20 and 80 years, without diabetes, cancer, or heart disease, were included.

RESULTS:

The highest added or total fructose intake (quartiles by grams or % energy) was not associated with an increase of hyperuricemia risk compared to the lowest intake with or without adjustment (odds ratios = 0.515-0.992). The associations of alcohol and fiber intakes with the risk were also determined. Compared to the lowest intake, the highest alcohol intake was associated with increased mean serum uric acid concentration (up to 16%, P < 0.001) and hyperuricemia risk (odds ratios = 1.658-1.829, P = 0.057- < 0.001); the highest fiber intake was correlated with decreases of uric acid concentration (up to 7.5%, P < 0.002) and lower risk (odds ratios = 0.448-0.478, P = 0.001- < 0.001). Adults who were over 50 y old, male, or obese had significantly greater risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data show that increased dietary fructose intake was not associated with increased hyperuricemia risk; while increased dietary alcohol intake was significantly associated with increased hyperuricemia risk; and increased fiber intake was significantly associated with decreased hyperuricemia risk. These data further suggest a potential effect of fructose consumption in an ordinary diet on serum uric acid differs from results found in some short-term studies using atypical exposure and/or levels of fructose administration.

PMID:
20193069
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC2842271
Free PMC Article

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