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J Biomech. 2010 May 7;43(7):1322-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2010.01.018. Epub 2010 Mar 1.

Biomechanical remodelling of obstructed guinea pig jejunum.

Author information

  • 1Mech-Sense, Aalborg Hospital Science and Innovation Centre (AHSIC), Sdr. Skovvej 15, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark. jzhao@hst.aau.dk

Abstract

Data on morphological and biomechanical remodelling are needed to understand the mechanisms behind intestinal obstruction. The effect of partial obstruction on mechanical properties with reference to the zero-stress state and on the histomorphological properties of the guinea pig small intestine was determined in this study. Partial obstruction and sham operation were surgically created in mid-jejunum of guinea pigs. The animals survived 2, 4, 7, and 14 days. The age-matched guinea pigs that were not operated served as normal controls. The segment proximal to the obstruction site was used for histological analysis, no-load state and zero-stress state data, and distension test. The segment for distension was immersed in an organ bath and inflated to 10cm H(2)O. The outer diameter change during the inflation was monitored using a microscope with CCD camera. Circumferential stresses and strains were computed from the diameter, pressure and the zero-stress state data. The opening angle and absolute value of residual strain decreased (P<0.01 and P<0.001) whereas the wall thickness, wall cross-sectional area, and the wall stiffness increased after 7 days obstruction (P<0.05, P<0.01). Histologically, the muscle and submucosa layers, especially the circumferential muscle layer increased in thickness after obstruction. The opening angle and residual strain mainly depended on the thickness of the muscle layer whereas the wall stiffness mainly depended on the thickness of the submucosa layer. In conclusion, the histomorphological and biomechanical properties of small intestine (referenced for the first time to the zero-stress state) remodel proximal to the obstruction site in a time-dependent manner.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20189575
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2857539
Free PMC Article

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