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Free Radic Biol Med. 2010 Jun 1;48(11):1501-12. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2010.02.028. Epub 2010 Feb 25.

Enhanced expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase leads to prolonged in vivo cell cycle progression and up-regulation of mitochondrial thioredoxin.

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  • 1Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an important mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, and elevated MnSOD levels have been shown to reduce tumor growth in part by suppressing cell proliferation. Studies with fibroblasts have shown that increased MnSOD expression prolongs cell cycle transition time in G1/S and favors entrance into the quiescent state. To determine if the same effect occurs during tissue regeneration in vivo, we used a transgenic mouse system with liver-specific MnSOD expression and a partial hepatectomy paradigm to induce synchronized in vivo cell proliferation during liver regeneration. We show in this experimental system that a 2.6-fold increase in MnSOD activity leads to delayed entry into S phase, as measured by reduction in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and decreased expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Thus, compared to control mice with baseline MnSOD levels, transgenic mice with increased MnSOD expression in the liver have 23% fewer BrdU-positive cells and a marked attenuation of PCNA expression. The increase in MnSOD activity also leads to an increase in the mitochondrial form of thioredoxin (thioredoxin 2), but not in several other peroxidases examined, suggesting the importance of thioredoxin 2 in maintaining redox balance in mitochondria with elevated levels of MnSOD.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
20188820
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2945707
Free PMC Article
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