Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2009 Dec;19(6):583-97.

Effects of exercise on hepcidin response and iron metabolism during recovery.

Author information

  • 1School of Sport Science, Exercise and Health, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia.

Abstract

Urinary hepcidin, inflammation, and iron metabolism were examined during the 24 hr after exercise. Eight moderately trained athletes (6 men, 2 women) completed a 60-min running trial (15-min warm-up at 75-80% HR(peak) + 45 min at 85-90% HR(peak)) and a 60-min trial of seated rest in a randomized, crossover design. Venous blood and urine samples were collected pretrial, immediately posttrial, and at 3, 6, and 24 hr posttrial. Samples were analyzed for interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum iron, serum ferritin, and urinary hepcidin. The immediate postrun levels of IL-6 and 24-hr postrun levels of CRP were significantly increased from baseline (6.9 and 2.6 times greater, respectively) and when compared with the rest trial (p < or = .05). Hepcidin levels in the run trial after 3, 6, and 24 hr of recovery were significantly greater (1.7-3.1 times) than the pre- and immediate postrun levels (p < or = .05). This outcome was consistent in all participants, despite marked variation in the magnitude of rise. In addition, the 3-hr postrun levels of hepcidin were significantly greater than at 3 hr in the rest trial (3.0 times greater, p < or = .05). Hepcidin levels continued to increase at 6 hr postrun but failed to significantly differ from the rest trial (p = .071), possibly because of diurnal influence. Finally, serum iron levels were significantly increased immediately postrun (1.3 times, p < or = .05). The authors concluded that high-intensity exercise was responsible for a significant increase in hepcidin levels subsequent to a significant increase in IL-6 and serum iron.

PMID:
20175428
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk