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Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 Jun;21(6):418-23. doi: 10.1016/j.numecd.2009.10.020. Epub 2010 Feb 18.

Coffee consumption and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in men and women with normal glucose tolerance: the Strong Heart Study.

Author information

  • 1Center for American Indian Health Research, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, P.O. Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK 73190, USA. Ying-zhang4@ouhsc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

It was reported that high coffee consumption was related to decreased diabetes risk. The aim of this study is to examine the association between coffee consumption and the incidence of type 2 diabetes in persons with normal glucose tolerance in a population with a high incidence and prevalence of diabetes.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In a prospective cohort study, information about daily coffee consumption was collected at the baseline examination (1989-1992) in a population-based sample of American Indian men and women 45-74 years of age. Participants with normal glucose tolerance (N = 1141) at the baseline examination were followed for an average of 7.6 years. The incidence of diabetes was compared across the categories of daily coffee consumption. The hazard ratios of diabetes related to coffee consumption were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for potential confounders. Levels of coffee consumption were positively related to levels of current smoking and inversely related to body mass index, waist circumference, female gender, and hypertension. Compared to those who did not drink coffee, participants who drank 12 or more cups of coffee daily had 67% less risk of developing diabetes during the follow-up (hazard ratio: 0.33, 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.81).

CONCLUSION:

In this population, a high level of coffee consumption was associated with a reduced risk of deterioration of glucose metabolism over an average 7.6 years of follow-up. More work is needed to understand whether there is a plausible biological mechanism for this observation.

Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20171062
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2888983
Free PMC Article

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