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J Contin Educ Nurs. 2010 Feb;41(2):67-76. doi: 10.3928/00220124-20100126-04.

Bioterrorism knowledge and educational participation of nurses in Missouri.

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  • 1Institute for Biosecurity, Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Saint Louis University School of Public Health, 3545 Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nurses are integral to bioterrorism preparedness, but nurses' bioterrorism preparedness knowledge has not been evaluated well.

METHODS:

Missouri Nurses Association members (1,528) were studied in the summer of 2006 to assess their bioterrorism knowledge and the perceived benefits of education as well as barriers to education.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 31%. Most respondents (60%, n = 284) received no bioterrorism education. Nurses who were nurse practitioners (t = -2.42, p < .05), were male (t = -2.99, p < .01), or were on a planning committee (t = -1.96, p = .05) had received more education than other nurses. The most commonly cited barrier to education (46.6%, n = 221) was not knowing where to obtain training. One third of respondents (31.2%) reported no interest in receiving bioterrorism education in the future. Nurses' average score on the knowledge test was 73%. The most commonly missed questions pertained to infection control and decontamination procedures.

CONCLUSION:

Bioterrorism preparedness training should be offered through continuing education and nursing school curricula.

Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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