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Ophthalmology. 2010 Jun;117(6):1163-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2009.10.043. Epub 2010 Feb 13.

Vitamin E and age-related macular degeneration in a randomized trial of women.

Author information

  • 1Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. wchristen@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test whether alternate day vitamin E affects the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a large-scale randomized trial of women.

DESIGN:

Randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial.

PARTICIPANTS:

Thirty-nine thousand eight hundred seventy-six apparently healthy female health professionals aged 45 years or older.

INTERVENTION:

Participants were assigned randomly to receive either 600 IU of natural-source vitamin E on alternate days or placebo.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Incident AMD responsible for a reduction in best-corrected visual acuity to 20/30 or worse based on self-report confirmed by medical record review.

RESULTS:

After 10 years of treatment and follow-up, there were 117 cases of AMD in the vitamin E group and 128 cases in the placebo group (relative risk, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-1.19).

CONCLUSIONS:

In a large-scale randomized trial of female health professionals, long-term alternate-day use of 600 IU of natural-source vitamin E had no large beneficial or harmful effect on risk of AMD.

Copyright 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20153900
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2881167
Free PMC Article
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