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Psychiatry Res. 2010 Mar 30;181(3):199-203. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2009.10.001. Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Short-TE proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation in adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University and Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

In this study, short echo time (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was applied for quantification of neurometabolites using the LC Model algorithm in Taiwanese adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Proton magnetic resonance spectra were acquired bilaterally on the prefrontal area (part of the anterior cingulate gyrus and part of the medial frontal gyrus) in 15 adolescents with ADHD (average age of 13.88years) and 22 controls (average age of 14.85years). Absolute metabolite levels and ratios relative to creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr) were obtained to be compared between groups. Results showed that adolescents with ADHD had significantly lower mean right prefrontal levels of Cr+PCr as compared with the controls. No significant differences between groups were noted in the remainder of the prefrontal metabolites. As for the group comparison of relative ratios, the N-acetylaspartate/Cr+PCr ratio was significantly higher in the right prefrontal regions of ADHD adolescents. This finding provides evidence of a right prefrontal neurochemical alteration in ADHD adolescents, which is consistent with current ADHD theory of prefrontal neuropathology with developmental mechanism. In addition, it highlights the importance of the method in interpretation of MRS findings in the context of ADHD.

Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20153148
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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