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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Mar;19(3):365-70. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2009.1891.

Invasive and in situ cervical cancer reported to the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS).

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  • 1Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recommended in 2006 for routine vaccination of 11 or 12-year-old girls, with catchup through age 26 years, for the prevention of genital HPV-related diseases. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is a national spontaneous surveillance system of adverse events following vaccination in the United States. The objective of this study was to identify and review VAERS reports of invasive and in situ cervical cancer in women immunized with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. A VAERS database search was performed to identify such cases reported in the United States from January 1, 2006, through April 9, 2009. Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) search terms used were "cervix carcinoma," "cervix carcinoma stage 0," "cervix carcinoma stage III," "carcinoma in situ," and "cervical dysplasia." Case inclusion required a report to contain a clear statement of a cervical carcinoma or carcinoma in situ diagnosis on any screening or diagnostic test after at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. All reports were reviewed by two investigators. Four VAERS reports for MedDRA term "cervix carcinoma," one for "cervix carcinoma stage 0," none for "cervix carcinoma stage III," three for "carcinoma in situ," and 53 for "cervical dysplasia" were identified. Of these, three cases of carcinoma in situ and one case of microinvasive cervical cancer met study inclusion criteria. Cases of cervical cancer and precancers are not unexpected in vaccinated women. Cervical cancer screening continues to be important, even for women who have received the HPV vaccine.

PMID:
20141382
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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