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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Jun;202(6):541.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2009.12.013. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

Inpatient hospitalization for gynecologic disorders in the United States.

Author information

  • 1Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine trends in hospitalizations for gynecologic disorders in the United States.

STUDY DESIGN:

Data on hospitalizations from 1998-2005 among women 15-54 years old were from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a nationally representative survey of inpatient hospitalizations. Hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of a gynecologic disorder were used to estimate rates per 10,000 women.

RESULTS:

Gynecologic disorders accounted for 7% and 14% of all hospitalizations among women 15-44 and 45-54 years old, respectively. The most common diagnoses were uterine leiomyomas (rate = 27.5), menstrual disorders (rate = 12.3), endometriosis (rate = 9.5), genital prolapse (rate = 7.0), benign ovarian cysts (rate = 6.5), and pelvic inflammatory disease (rate = 6.1). The hospitalization rate for menstrual disorders increased from 9.8 in 1998 to 13.3 in 2005 (P trend < .001). In contrast, rates declined for pelvic inflammatory disease, genital prolapse, benign ovarian cysts, and endometriosis (P trend < .05) and were unchanged for uterine leiomyoma.

CONCLUSION:

Gynecologic disorders are an important contributor to inpatient hospitalization among women in the United States.

Published by Mosby, Inc.

PMID:
20132921
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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