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Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. 2010 Aug;37(9):1778-85. doi: 10.1007/s00259-009-1368-6. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

Does amifostine have radioprotective effects on salivary glands in high-dose radioactive iodine-treated differentiated thyroid cancer.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong Province, China. mc_7419@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the effects of amifostine on salivary glands in radioactive iodine-treated differentiated thyroid cancer.

METHODS:

We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library for randomized controlled clinical trials which compared the effects of amifostine with those of placebo or acid-stimulating agents.

RESULTS:

Two randomized controlled clinical trials with a total of 130 patients were included. Both studies had a low risk of bias. There were no statistically significant differences between the effects of amifostine and acid-stimulating agents on the incidence of xerostomia (RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.01 to 9.52), the decrease of scintigraphically measured uptake of (99m)Tc by the parotid (RR 0.30, 95% CI -2.28 to 2.88) or submandibular glands (RR 1.90, 95% CI -1.46 to 5.26) at 12 months, or the reduction in blood pressure (RR 5.00, 95% CI 0.25 to 99.16). Neither of the included trials investigated death from any cause, morbidity, health-related quality of life or costs.

CONCLUSION:

The results of two randomized controlled clinical trials suggest that amifostine has no significant radioprotective effects on salivary glands in radioactive iodine treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The use of acid-stimulating agents to increase salivation should remain the first choice during radioactive iodine treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. Patients should also be well informed of the importance of hydration and acid stimulation.

PMID:
20130857
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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