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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2010 Apr;23(2):162-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-277X.2009.01029.x. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

Association between fruit juice consumption and self-reported body mass index among adult Canadians.

Author information

  • 1School of Nursing and Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. daneshn@mcmaster.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of obesity and being overweight is rising among adult Canadians and diet is recognised as one of the main causes of obesity. The consumption of fruit and vegetables is shown to be protective against obesity and being overweight but little is known about the association of fruit juice consumption and obesity and being overweight. The present study aimed to investigate the association between fruit juice consumption and self-reported body mass index (BMI) among adult Canadians.

METHODS:

This analysis is based on the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 3.1. A regression method was used to assess the association of fruit juice consumption with self-reported BMI in 18-64-year-old Canadians who had been adjusted for sex, age, total household income, education, self-rated health, and daily energy expenditure. Because the analysis is based on a cross-sectional dataset, it does not imply a cause and effect relationship.

RESULTS:

Almost 38.6% of adult Canadians reported a fruit juice intake of 0.5-1.4 times per day and 18.2% consumed fruit juice more than 1.5 times per day. Participants with normal weight were likely to consume more fruit juice than obese individuals. Regression analysis showed a negative association between fruit juice consumption and BMI after adjusting for age, sex, education, marital status, income, total fruit and vegetable intake, daily energy expenditure, and self-rated health. On average, for each daily serving of fruit juice, a -0.22 unit (95% confidence interval = -0.33 to -0.11) decrease in BMI was observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results obtained showed a moderate negative association between fruit juice intake and BMI, which may suggest that a moderate daily consumption of fruit juice is associated with normal weight status.

PMID:
20113383
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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