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BMC Neurol. 2010 Jan 28;10:10. doi: 10.1186/1471-2377-10-10.

Treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with co-enzyme Q10 and amitriptyline, a retrospective study.

Author information

  • 1Division of Medical Genetics and the Saban Research Institute, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, 4650 Sunset Blvd,, Los Angeles, California 90027, USA. rboles@chla.usc.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), which is defined by recurrent stereotypical episodes of nausea and vomiting, is a relatively-common disabling condition that is associated with migraine headache and mitochondrial dysfunction. Co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q) is a nutritional supplement that has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric and adult migraine. It is increasingly used in CVS despite the complete lack of studies to demonstrate its value in treatment

METHODS:

Using an Internet-based survey filled out by subjects with CVS or their parents, the efficacy, tolerability and subject satisfaction in CVS prophylaxis were queried. Subjects taking Co-Q (22 subjects) were compared against those taking amitriptyline (162 subjects), which is the general standard-of-care.

RESULTS:

Subjects/parents reported similar levels of efficacy for a variety of episode parameters (frequency, duration, number of emesis, nausea severity). There was a 50% reduction in at least one of those four parameters in 72% of subjects treated with amitriptyline and 68% of subjects treated Co-Q. However, while no side effects were reported on Co-Q, 50% of subjects on amitriptyline reported side effects (P = 5 x 10-7), resulting in 21% discontinuing treatment (P = 0.007). Subjects/parents considered the benefits to outweigh the risks of treatment in 47% of cases on amitriptyline and 77% of cases on Co-Q (P = 0.008).

CONCLUSION:

Our data suggest that the natural food supplement Co-Q is potentially efficacious and tolerable in the treatment of CVS, and should be considered as an option in CVS prophylaxis. Our data would likely be helpful in the design of a double-blind clinical trial.

PMID:
20109231
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2825193
Free PMC Article
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