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Diabetes Care. 2010 Apr;33(4):823-5. doi: 10.2337/dc09-1834. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

Changes in glitazone use among office-based physicians in the U.S., 2003-2009.

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  • 1Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Little is known regarding recent changes in glitazone use.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Interrupted time series analyses of nationally representative office-visit data using IMS Health's National Disease and Therapeutic Index.

RESULTS:

From 2003 through 2005, glitazone use increased steadily. From February 2005 to January 2007, rosiglitazone use decreased by 16% (95% CI -20 to -11) annually; pioglitazone use increased at an annual rate of 14% (9-18). During a period of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisories, rosiglitazone use declined sharply from 0.42 million monthly treatment visits (February 2007) to 0.13 million monthly visits (May 2008). Pioglitazone use remained stable, accounting for approximately 5.8 million physician visits (77% of all glitazone use) where a treatment was used during the final 12 months of observation.

CONCLUSIONS:

The combined effect of scientific publications, advisories, and media exposure was associated with a substantial decrease in rosiglitazone use. Despite a class-level FDA advisory, pioglitazone use was not similarly affected.

PMID:
20103549
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2845035
Free PMC Article

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