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Nat Cell Biol. 2010 Feb;12(2):111-8. doi: 10.1038/ncb2011. Epub 2010 Jan 24.

DNA zip codes control an ancient mechanism for gene targeting to the nuclear periphery.

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  • 1Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.

Erratum in

  • Nat Cell Biol. 2010 Mar;12(3):306.

Abstract

Many genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are recruited to the nuclear periphery after transcriptional activation. We have identified two gene recruitment sequences (GRS I and II) from the promoter of the INO1 gene that target the gene to the nuclear periphery. These GRSs function as DNA zip codes and are sufficient to target a nucleoplasmic locus to the nuclear periphery. Targeting requires components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and a GRS is sufficient to confer a physical interaction with the NPC. GRS I elements are enriched in promoters of genes that interact with the NPC, and genes that are induced by protein folding stress. Full transcriptional activation of INO1 and another GRS-containing gene requires GRS-mediated targeting of the promoter to the nuclear periphery. Finally, GRS I also functions as a DNA zip code in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that this mechanism of targeting to the nuclear periphery has been conserved over approximately one billion years of evolution.

PMID:
20098417
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2835469
Free PMC Article

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