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J Emerg Med. 2011 Mar;40(3):340-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2009.10.024. Epub 2010 Jan 25.

Firework-related injuries in Tehran's Persian Wednesday Eve Festival (Chaharshanbe Soori).

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Amir Alam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fireworks are the leading cause of injuries such as burns and amputations during the Persian Wednesday Eve Festival (Chaharshanbeh Soori).

OBJECTIVES:

This study was designed to explore the age of the high-risk population, the type of fireworks most frequently causing injury, the pattern of injury, and the frequency of permanent disabilities.

METHODS:

This cohort study was performed by Tehran Emergency Medical Services at different medical centers all around Tehran, Iran, in individuals referred due to firework-related injuries during 1 month surrounding the festival in the year 2007. The following information was extracted from the patients' medical records: demographic data, the type of fireworks causing injury, the pattern and severity of the injury, the pre-hospital and hospital care provided for the patient, and the patient's condition at the time of discharge. In addition, information on the severity of the remaining disability was recorded 8 months after the injury.

RESULTS:

There were 197 patients enrolled in the study with a mean age of 20.94 ± 11.31 years; the majority of them were male. Fuse-detonated noisemakers and homemade grenades were the most frequent causes of injury. Hand injury was reported in 39.8% of the cases. Amputation and long-term disability were found in 6 and 12 cases, respectively. None of the patients died during the study period.

CONCLUSION:

The fireworks used during a Chaharshanbe Soori ceremony were responsible for a considerable number of injuries to different parts of the body, and some of them led to permanent disabilities.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20097501
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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