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Mol Biosyst. 2010 Feb;6(2):349-56. doi: 10.1039/b918106g. Epub 2009 Dec 1.

Functional characterization of tlmH in Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC 31158 unveiling new insight into tallysomycin biosynthesis and affording a novel bleomycin analog.

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  • 1Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705-2222, USA.

Abstract

Tallysomycins (TLMs) belong to the bleomycin (BLM) family of anticancer antibiotics and differ from the BLMs principally by the presence of a 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-L-talose attached to C-41 of the TLM backbone as part of a glycosylcarbinolamide. To facilitate an understanding of the differences in anticancer activities observed between TLMs and BLMs, we thought to generate des-talose TLM analogs by engineering TLM biosynthesis in Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC 31158. Here we report (i) the engineering of the DeltatlmH mutant SB8005 strain that produces the two TLM analogs, TLM H-1 and TLM H-2, (ii) production, isolation, and structural elucidation of TLM H-1 and TLM H-2 by NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses as the desired des-talose TLM analogs, and (iii) comparison of the DNA cleavage activities of TLM H-1 with selected TLMs and BLMs. These findings support the previous functional assignment of tlmH to encode an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent hydroxylase and unveil the TlmH-catalyzed hydroxylation at both C-41 and C-42 and the TlmK-catalyzed glycosylation of a labile carbinolamide intermediate as the final two steps for TLM biosynthesis. TlmH is apparently distinct from other enzymes known to catalyze carbinolamide formation. The availability of TLM H-1 now sets the stage to study the TlmH enzymology in vitro and to elucidate the exact contribution of the l-talose to the anticancer activities of TLMs in vivo.

PMID:
20094654
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3082865
Free PMC Article
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