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Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Feb;115(2 Pt 1):338-43. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181c915da.

Effect of birth weight on adverse obstetric outcomes in vaginal birth after cesarean delivery.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Hôpital Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the association between neonatal birth weight and adverse obstetric outcomes in women attempting vaginal birth after cesarean.

METHODS:

We reviewed the medical records of all women undergoing a trial of labor after a prior low transverse cesarean delivery in our institution between 1987 and 2004. Patients were categorized according to birth weight (less than 3,500 g [group 1, reference], 3,500-3,999 g [group 2], and 4,000 g or more [group 3]) and prior vaginal delivery. The rates of failed trial of labor, uterine rupture, shoulder dystocia, and third- and fourth-degree perineal laceration were compared among groups. Multivariable logistic regressions were performed to adjust for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS:

Of 2,586 women, 1,519 (59%), 798 (31%), and 269 (10%) were included in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Birth weight was directly correlated to the rate of failed trial of labor (19%, 28%, and 38% for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively; P<.01), uterine rupture (0.9%, 1.8%, and 2.6%; P<.05), shoulder dystocia (0.3%, 1.6%, and 7.8%; P<.01), and third- and fourth-degree perineal laceration (5%, 7%, and 12%; P<.01). After adjustment for confounding variables, birth weight of 4,000 g or more remained associated with uterine rupture (odds ratio [OR] 2.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.001-6.85), failed trial of labor (OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.82-3.34), shoulder dystocia (OR 25.13, 95% CI 9.31-67.86), and third- and fourth-degree perineal laceration (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.66-4.19).

CONCLUSION:

Birth weight and specifically macrosomia are linked with failed trial of labor, uterine rupture, shoulder dystocia, and third- and fourth-degree perineal laceration in women who underwent prior cesarean delivery. Estimated fetal weight should be included in the decision-making process for all women contemplating a trial of labor after cesarean delivery.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

II.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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