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Pathology. 2010 Feb;42(2):151-4. doi: 10.3109/00313020903494086.

Microglial activation as a measure of stress in mouse brains exposed acutely (60 minutes) and long-term (2 years) to mobile telephone radiofrequency fields.

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  • 1Hanson Institute Centre for Neurological Diseases, Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia.

Abstract

AIM:

To determine whether acute or long-term exposure of the brain to mobile telephone radiofrequency (RF) fields produces activation of microglia, which normally respond rapidly to any change in their microenvironment.

METHODS:

Using a purpose designed exposure system at 900 MHz, mice were given a single, far-field whole body exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4 W/kg for 60 min (acute) or on five successive days per week for 104 weeks (long-term). Control mice were sham-exposed or freely mobile in a cage to control for any stress caused by immobilisation in the exposure module. Positive control brains subjected to a stab wound were also included to confirm the ability of microglia to react to any neural stress. Brains were perfusion-fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and representative regions of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus immunostained for ionised calcium binding adaptor molecule (Iba1), a specific microglial marker.

RESULTS:

There was no increase in microglial Iba1 expression in brains short or long-term exposed to mobile telephony microwaves compared to control (sham-exposed or freely moving caged mice) brains, while substantial microglial activation occurred in damaged positive control neural tissue.

CONCLUSION:

Acute (60 minutes) or longer duration (2 years) exposure of murine brains to mobile telephone RF fields did not produce any microglial activation detectable by Iba1 immunostaining.

PMID:
20085509
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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