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Genes Dev. 2010 Jan 15;24(2):183-94. doi: 10.1101/gad.1860310.

A vertebrate gene, ticrr, is an essential checkpoint and replication regulator.

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  • 1David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

Abstract

Eukaryotes have numerous checkpoint pathways to protect genome fidelity during normal cell division and in response to DNA damage. Through a screen for G2/M checkpoint regulators in zebrafish, we identified ticrr (for TopBP1-interacting, checkpoint, and replication regulator), a previously uncharacterized gene that is required to prevent mitotic entry after treatment with ionizing radiation. Ticrr deficiency is embryonic-lethal in the absence of exogenous DNA damage because it is essential for normal cell cycle progression. Specifically, the loss of ticrr impairs DNA replication and disrupts the S/M checkpoint, leading to premature mitotic entry and mitotic catastrophe. We show that the human TICRR ortholog associates with TopBP1, a known checkpoint protein and a core component of the DNA replication preinitiation complex (pre-IC), and that the TICRR-TopBP1 interaction is stable without chromatin and requires BRCT motifs essential for TopBP1's replication and checkpoint functions. Most importantly, we find that ticrr deficiency disrupts chromatin binding of pre-IC, but not prereplication complex, components. Taken together, our data show that TICRR acts in association with TopBP1 and plays an essential role in pre-IC formation. It remains to be determined whether Ticrr represents the vertebrate ortholog of the yeast pre-IC component Sld3, or a hitherto unknown metazoan replication and checkpoint regulator.

PMID:
20080954
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2807353
Free PMC Article

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