Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Annu Rev Pathol. 2010;5:253-95. doi: 10.1146/annurev.pathol.4.110807.092250.

Mammalian sirtuins: biological insights and disease relevance.

Author information

  • 1Glenn Laboratories for the Molecular Biology of Aging, Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. Marcia_Haigis@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract

Aging is accompanied by a decline in the healthy function of multiple organ systems, leading to increased incidence and mortality from diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Historically, researchers have focused on investigating individual pathways in isolated organs as a strategy to identify the root cause of a disease, with hopes of designing better drugs. Studies of aging in yeast led to the discovery of a family of conserved enzymes known as the sirtuins, which affect multiple pathways that increase the life span and the overall health of organisms. Since the discovery of the first known mammalian sirtuin, SIRT1, 10 years ago, there have been major advances in our understanding of the enzymology of sirtuins, their regulation, and their ability to broadly improve mammalian physiology and health span. This review summarizes and discusses the advances of the past decade and the challenges that will confront the field in the coming years.

PMID:
20078221
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2866163
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (8)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk