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Thromb Res. 2010 May;125(5):e210-3. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2009.12.011. Epub 2010 Jan 13.

Parameters of the thrombogram are associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at baseline, but not affected during supplementation with vitamin D.

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  • 1Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. rolf.jorde@unn.no

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In vitro studies indicate an anticoagulant effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and sun exposure may lower the risk of thrombotic events. Accordingly, an effect on haemostatic parameters could be expected after supplementation with vitamin D.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

158 obese or overweight subjects were included in a one year intervention study with supplementation with 40.000 IU vitamin D(3) per week or placebo. All subjects were given 500 mg calcium daily. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator antigen (tPA Ag), and tissue factor-induced thrombin generation over time in plasma assessed by the calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) method as a parameter of over all thrombotic activity, were measured before and at the end of the study.

RESULTS:

Mean baseline serum 25(OH)D level was 61.8 nmol/L and increased in the vitamin D group to 145.6 nmol/L at the end of the study. At baseline there was a significant decrease in the CAT variables lag time and time to peak of the thrombogram across increasing serum 25(OH)D quartiles, whereas no significant associations between serum 25(OH)D and PAI-1 or tPA Ag were found. After one year, no significant differences were found between the vitamin D and placebo groups regarding change in any of the haemostatic parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between lag time and time to peak in the CAT assay and serum 25(OH)D levels could indicate a pro-thrombotic state in subjects with high serum 25(OH)D levels, whereas the lack of effect of high dose vitamin D supplementation questions the causality of this relation.

Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20071011
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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