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Mol Cell. 2009 Dec 25;36(6):954-69. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2009.12.002.

CtIP links DNA double-strand break sensing to resection.

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  • 1Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. zyou@wustl.edu

Abstract

In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), cells sense the DNA lesions and then activate the protein kinase ATM. Subsequent DSB resection produces RPA-coated ssDNA that is essential for activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR). However, the biochemical mechanism underlying the transition from DSB sensing to resection remains unclear. Using Xenopus egg extracts and human cells, we show that the tumor suppressor protein CtIP plays a critical role in this transition. We find that CtIP translocates to DSBs, a process dependent on the DSB sensor complex Mre11-Rad50-NBS1, the kinase activity of ATM, and a direct DNA-binding motif in CtIP, and then promotes DSB resection. Thus, CtIP facilitates the transition from DSB sensing to processing: it does so by binding to the DNA at DSBs after DSB sensing and ATM activation and then promoting DNA resection, leading to checkpoint activation and HR.

2009 Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
20064462
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2807415
Free PMC Article

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