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Public Health Genomics. 2011;14(1):1-8. doi: 10.1159/000272897. Epub 2009 Dec 29.

Translational research in cancer genetics: the road less traveled.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. schullys@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

Gene discoveries in cancer have the potential for clinical and public health applications. To take advantage of such discoveries, a translational research agenda is needed to take discoveries from the bench to population health impact. To assess the current status of translational research in cancer genetics, we analyzed the extramural grant portfolio of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) from Fiscal Year 2007, as well as the cancer genetic research articles published in 2007. We classified both funded grants and publications as follows: T0 as discovery research; T1 as research to develop a candidate health application (e.g., test or therapy); T2 as research that evaluates a candidate application and develops evidence-based recommendations; T3 as research that assesses how to integrate an evidence-based recommendation into cancer care and prevention; and T4 as research that assesses health outcomes and population impact. We found that 1.8% of the grant portfolio and 0.6% of the published literature was T2 research or beyond. In addition to discovery research in cancer genetics, a translational research infrastructure is urgently needed to methodically evaluate and translate gene discoveries for cancer care and prevention.

Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID:
20051673
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3025883
Free PMC Article
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