Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Cereb Cortex. 2010 Sep;20(9):2069-79. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhp279. Epub 2010 Jan 4.

Brain atrophy in healthy aging is related to CSF levels of Aβ1-42.

Author information

  • 1Center for the Study of Human Cognition, Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

Reduced levels of beta-amyloid(1-42) (Abeta1-42) and increased levels of tau proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are found in Alzheimer's disease (AD), likely reflecting Abeta deposition in plaques and neuronal and axonal damage. It is not known whether these biomarkers are associated with brain atrophy also in healthy aging. We tested the relationship between CSF levels of Abeta1-42 and tau (total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181) proteins and 1-year brain atrophy in 71 cognitively normal elderly individuals. Results showed that under a certain threshold value, levels of Abeta1-42 correlated highly with 1-year change in a wide range of brain areas. The strongest relationships were not found in the regions most vulnerable early in AD. Above the threshold level, Abeta1-42 was not related to brain changes, but significant volume reductions as well as ventricular expansion were still seen. It is concluded that Abeta1-42 correlates with brain atrophy and ventricular expansion in a subgroup of cognitively normal elderly individuals but that reductions independent of CSF levels of Abeta1-42 is common. Further research and follow-up examinations over several years are needed to test whether degenerative pathology will eventually develop in the group of cognitively normal elderly individuals with low levels of Abeta1-42.

PMID:
20051356
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3025722
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (4)Free text

Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk