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J Invest Dermatol. 2010 May;130(5):1438-43. doi: 10.1038/jid.2009.402. Epub 2009 Dec 31.

Association of prediagnostic serum vitamin D levels with the development of basal cell carcinoma.

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  • 1Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, USA.


We investigated the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk in a nested case-control study at Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC). A total of 220 case patients with BCC diagnosed after serum collection were matched to 220 control subjects. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression. Fully adjusted models included body mass index (BMI), smoking, education, sun-exposure variables, X-ray exposure, and personal history of cancer. For each measure of serum 25(OH)D (continuous, clinically relevant tertiles, quintiles), we found an increased risk of BCC in unadjusted models (OR=1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.05, P<0.05; OR=3.98, 95% CI: 1.31-12.31, deficient vs. sufficient, test for trend P-value <0.01; OR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.20-4.50, 1st vs. 5th quintile, test for trend P-value 0.03). In fully adjusted models, the values attenuated slightly (OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05, P<0.05; OR=3.61, 95% CI: 1.00-13.10, deficient vs. sufficient, t-trend P=0.03; OR=2.09 1st vs. 5th quintile, 95% CI: 0.95-4.58, t-trend P=0.11). Our findings suggest that higher prediagnostic serum 25(OH)D levels may be associated with increased risk of subsequent BCC. Further studies to evaluate the effect of sun exposure on BCC and serum 25(OH)D levels may be warranted.

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