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J Pediatr. 2010 Apr;156(4):562-7.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2009.10.040. Epub 2009 Dec 29.

An exclusively human milk-based diet is associated with a lower rate of necrotizing enterocolitis than a diet of human milk and bovine milk-based products.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the health benefits of an exclusively human milk-based diet compared with a diet of both human milk and bovine milk-based products in extremely premature infants.

STUDY DESIGN:

Infants fed their own mothers' milk were randomized to 1 of 3 study groups. Groups HM100 and HM40 received pasteurized donor human milk-based human milk fortifier when the enteral intake was 100 and 40 mL/kg/d, respectively, and both groups received pasteurized donor human milk if no mother's milk was available. Group BOV received bovine milk-based human milk fortifier when the enteral intake was 100 mL/kg/d and preterm formula if no mother's milk was available. Outcomes included duration of parenteral nutrition, morbidity, and growth.

RESULTS:

The 3 groups (total n = 207 infants) had similar baseline demographic variables, duration of parenteral nutrition, rates of late-onset sepsis, and growth. The groups receiving an exclusively human milk diet had significantly lower rates of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC; P = .02) and NEC requiring surgical intervention (P = .007).

CONCLUSIONS:

For extremely premature infants, an exclusively human milk-based diet is associated with significantly lower rates of NEC and surgical NEC when compared with a mother's milk-based diet that also includes bovine milk-based products.

Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20036378
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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